Things you should know about Demolition – Chardon, Ohio

Demolition of a home can be exciting for someone who’s never seen one get torn down before.  For a complete demotion, a home can be torn down and be entirely removed from the site in a day or two.  Demolition is usually fast and messy, it’s not necessarily easy.   There’s actually quite a bit to know about demolition so nothing is damaged.  Over the years we’ve seen it all and have learned a few things we’d like to share.

1.   Demolition isn’t for the do it yourselfer.  While it may look easy, it takes an experience operator to demo a structure without damaging something that shouldn’t be and damaging the machine.  It can also be easy to injure yourself if you don’t know what you’re doing.  I kind of think of it as large scale surgery.

2.    Let the neighbors know a demolition project is going on.  It’s usually a good ideal to let people around the demo project when it’s happening.   People get kind of excited when they’re asleep and structures start getting torn down next door to them without any notice.

3.    Get your permits.  Demolition is obvious and something you can’t hide.   The neighbors will notice the 40 yard dumpster sitting in your driveway and a large machine being delivered to the demolition site.   Check to see if any permit are needed for your demolition project with the city and county.

4.    Asbestos is a big deal.  Nothing will shut down a project quicker than an asbestos violation.  Please make sure your structure is free from any asbestos.   The removal of asbestos can be difficult and require special permits depending on what it is.  Most of the time, only specialized contractors are allowed to remove asbestos although every situation is different.  It’s definitely best to call someone who specializes in it’s removal if it’s part of the demolition.

5.   Make sure all the utilities are disconnected. Utility companies will need to be notified and will usually send out their own people to disconnect things like electric, gas, cable and phone.  Most of the time, the demolition contractor will be required to abandon sewers and water lines.  These will usually require their own permits and inspections to verify they were abandoned properly.

6.   Make sure all underground utilities are marked . It’s wise to call Utilities protection services and get everything marked that’s in the ground.  This will avoid any accidental damages to underground utilities that will add extra costs to the job and delay the demolition.

7.   Always budget at least 10% more for a demolition project.  Many times when a home, building or structure is being torn down, you find things that need to be addressed.  In the past, we’ve found old foundations to garages, buried oil tanks, and even a buried car  one time!  These unforeseen circumstances will add costs to the project.  I always tell people who are having a structure demolished, expect the unexpected, and hope for the best.

8.  You’d be surprised how many items and materials can be reused or recycled from the demolition of a home.  When tearing down a house there’s usually many things that can be salvaged.  If the cabinets are in good shape, many people will reuse them for garage cabinets.  Some of the windows may have been replaced and can be reused on occasion.   Also, any of the steel that’s used for construction can usually be reused or taken to a scrap yard where you’ll be able to get some money out of it.  Copper pipe and wire also brings decent money if it’s taken out and separated.  If you’re going to salvage things from the home, it’s best to have it done before the demolition contractor gets on site.  It doesn’t take long to level a home or structure so it’ll be too late to do this on the day of the demolition.

If you’d like to receive a free estimate for house tear down, or any other demolition project in Chardon, Ohio or the surrounding communities of Northeast, Ohio, please contact DiFranco contractors Inc at 440-946-2029 or fill out the form on the website.

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